“Like” and “alike” are synonyms to mean similar but not identical.

Like” is used to compare one person or thing to another

Alike” refers to two or more people or things that are similar to each other

Overview
LikeAlike
Compares one to anotherRefers to two that are similar to each other
Preposition, adjectiveAdjective, adverb
“Like” + [noun][Nouns or verb] + “alike”

Like

1. “Like” is used to compare one person or thing to another.
  • “I’m a chauffeur. I’m like a taxi driver for fancy people.”
  • “It’s been really hot and humid. I really hate weather like this.”
2. “Like” can be used a preposition.

like” + noun

  • ​”Don’t you think his son looks like Wally?”
  • “You can’t always treat him like a child.”
a. It is often used with sense verbs.

 Such as “look,” “seem,” “feel,” “smell,” or “sound.”

  • “To me, it smells like oranges.”
  • “When she sits there like that, she looks like grandma.”
b. You can also use adverbs of degree to add degrees of similarity.

Such as “quite,” “more,” “very,” “almost,” etc. They would go before “like.”

  • “The wall is more like red than orange.”
  • “Some plant-based alternatives taste almost like meat.”
3. “Like” as adjective.

like” + noun

  • “He responded in like manner.”
  • “They only hang out with other people of like minds.”

It can also be part of an adjective phrase.

  • Like-minded people don’t always get the job done.”​

Alike

1. “Alike” is used to refer to two or more people or things that are similar to each other.
  • “Some people say the boys look alike but I’m not so sure.”
  • “He thinks all lawyers are alike.”
2. “Alike” as adjective.

nouns or verb + “alike

  • “When I think about it, Wally and Jake are alike in many ways.”
  • “I’d like to say my parents treated us all alike.”
a. You can also use other adverbs of degree to add degrees of similarities.

Such as “quite,” “more,” “very,” “almost,” etc. They would go before “alike.”

  • “The two pieces are very much alike.”
  • “They were quite alike in their personalities.”
3. “Alike” can also be used as an adverb.

verb + “alike

  • “The twins dressed alike in pink dresses.”
  • “Great minds think alike.”

Original post: 2 April 2020