Contents:


Form

Affirmative sentences 

Full form:

subject + “will be” + present participle form of verb

  • “At 7pm, they‘ll be having dinner.”
  • “I‘ll be relaxing at a beach this time next week.”
Negative sentences 

Full form:

subject + “will not be” + present participle form of verb

Contracted form:

subject + “-‘ll not be” + present participle form of verb

  • “Unfortunately Eve won’t be coming to the conference.”
  • “He sprained his ankle so he won’t be playing this Saturday.”
Questions 

Full forms:

(a) “will” + subject + “be” + present participle form of verb

(b) question word + “will” + subject + “be” + present participle form of verb

  • Will he be working tomorrow?”
  • Where will you be performing next?”
Negative questions

It is possible to make negative questions even though their uses are quite specific. [See also: Negative questions]

The structure for full forms and contracted forms are slightly different. Contracted forms are preferred in general.

Contracted forms:

(a) “won’t” + subject + “be” + present participle form of verb

(b) question word + “won’t” + subject + “be” + present participle form of verb

Full form:

will” + subject + “not be” + present participle form of verb

question word + “will” + subject + “not be” + present participle form of verb

  • Won’t he be working tomorrow?”
  • Why will she not be joining us for dinner?”

Timeline

Like the future simple tense, using “will” means that this tense is used talk about activities in the future.


Uses of the Future continuous tense

1.   To refer to temporary actions or events in progress at a particular time in the future.
  • “I‘ll be driving to my friend’s after this.”
  • “We‘ll be flying to Malaysia next week.”
2.   To make predictions.

This is similar to the future simple.

  • “I think it’ll be raining later.”
  • “Wally will most likely be working tomorrow.”
a. To predict what is happening in the present.
  • “Wally will probably be having lunch at the moment.”
  • “Most likely, they’ll be having a meeting in the boardroom right now.
3.   To make polite enquiries.
  • Will you be attending the wedding?”
  • When will they be arriving from the airport?”
4.   To refer to scheduled future events.

The future simple can also be used here.

  • “Wally will be giving a lecture next week on the effects of climate change.”
  • “The train will be arriving soon.”

Original post: 7 October 2020

Advertisement